Tostones

Here is what you will need:

  1. Green plantains

  2. Corn oil

  3. Salt

  4. Pepper

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Peel your plantains and cut them in this diagonal shape. The traditional size is about an inch-and-a-half.

 

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We are frying today, so your pan should have a comfortable depth to cover the platanos. I recommend doing small batches at a time. The temperature should start at medium high. Make sure to wait until it is hot enough or else the platanos will soak the oil like a sponge and they will be no good. I have a trick for this.

 

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I throw in a little corner to make sure that the oil is ready. You are looking for this kind of bubbling. If it is not doing this yet then it is too cold. If it is smoking it is too hot, but this pictured is perfect. You are good to throw them in.

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Keep an eye on these in case you need to turn them. We are not fully frying them through-out so what we are looking for is a transition from this pale color to a bright yellow exterior.

 

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This is the right color. Not too raw but not too hard. This will ensure a smooth core and crispy exterior. At the right temperature this takes about five minutes.

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Have a plate with napkins ready to soak the oil.

 

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There is an actual device for this but it has been hard for me to find it in PDX. For now, use two median plates to smash each toston one by one.

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If you are going to use ceramic plates, please push from the center and NOT from the sides as it could break the plate and you could end up injured (speaking from experience). If its the right texture it only needs a slight push. Don't apply too much pressure and make it too thin. We are looking at about a quarter for an inch.

 

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Throw your smashed plantains these back on the oil. Usually at this point I double-check the temperature. Usually I have to raise it a tad bit more so that they come out crispy. Put back in another plate with napkins to absorb the oil.

 

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Sprinkle salt and pepper.

Your to stones should be a little bit more golden with a tad bit of marks. There are many ways to make this, but my mom used to be praised for her near immaculate to stones, these is her method. Cold tostones are no good, This is something to be made while you are hosting your friends and served immediately. For re-heating, they have to be re-fried with a thin layer of corn oil.

Bonus! Traditional pink sauce "salsa rosita" to serve alongside your tostones.

 

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Mix mostly mayo, ketchup, salt pepper and cayenne pepper until you get this color for a tangy caribbean aioli. Perfect to dip your plantain creation.

Buen provecho!

Mojo Criollo

Mojo is a very simple citrus-based marinade used on latin-caribbean fish, pork, chicken, soups and sometimes even on starches like yucca and sweet plantains! It is super simple and is key in the tenderness and flavor of our protein. I personally recommend it on steaks, chicken and ribs before grilling as well.

For about a cup:

1/2 cup of Sour orange

3 limes

salt and pepper to taste

1/4 cup of olive oil

Tbsp cumin

5-6 heads of garlic

Tbsp oregano

Tbsp of adobo (optional)

This the basic components, afterwards feel free to add more components depending on what you are trying to make. For this specific one I also blended onion and cilantro in search of that fresh earthiness for my shrimp.

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